Chinese Community – TJDJDJ http://tjdjdj.com/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 22:48:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tjdjdj.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Chinese Community – TJDJDJ http://tjdjdj.com/ 32 32 Other Pogo workers rescued | Applicant News https://tjdjdj.com/other-pogo-workers-rescued-applicant-news/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 21:10:00 +0000 https://tjdjdj.com/other-pogo-workers-rescued-applicant-news/ FORCED TO ROUND OTHERS Police officers from the Center for the Protection of Women and Children assist some of the 29 victims – 23 Burmese and six Chinese – of suspected human trafficking who were forced to work as con artists for a gambling operator in line. They were rescued from their dorm in Parañaque […]]]>

FORCED TO ROUND OTHERS Police officers from the Center for the Protection of Women and Children assist some of the 29 victims – 23 Burmese and six Chinese – of suspected human trafficking who were forced to work as con artists for a gambling operator in line. They were rescued from their dorm in Parañaque City on Thursday. —PHOTO PNP-PIO

MANILA, Philippines – In separate raids in South Metro Manila this week, police rescued 63 foreign nationals, all Asians, suspected of being victims of human trafficking and forced to work for operators of Philippine Offshore Games (Pogos), officials said on Friday.

Police General Eliseo Cruz, head of the Investigations and Detective Management Directorate, said they were the latest victims rescued from gambling operators in the country.

He said that since 2017, a year after the rise of online gambling in the country, the Philippine National Police has rescued 4,453 mostly Chinese victims of human trafficking in 1,312 successful operations. the arrest of 1,330 suspected traffickers. Among the victims were also Taiwanese, Burmese, Malaysians and Thais.

Police Colonel Ericson Dilag, deputy director of operations for the PNP Anti-Kidnapping Group (AKG), warned that human trafficking crimes would be a “bigger problem” than kidnappings and serious cases of unlawful detention involving children. Pogos.

According to the AKG, a total of 17 Pogo-related kidnappings were recorded in September, which exceeded the 12 recorded from January to December last year.

Filipino-Chinese community leader Teresita Ang See said illegal recruits for Pogos among mainland Chinese already number in the “thousands”, with deals mostly taking place on social media platforms.

In the first rescue at Barangay Alabang in the town of Muntinlupa on Wednesday, officers from the Southern Police District and Royal Malaysian Police rescued a Malaysian and 33 other foreigners who were believed to have been forced to work at Dexin 999, a Pogo service provider .

Their Chinese employer, Qian Jing, was arrested and would face charges of serious unlawful detention.

Unable to produce license

Dexin is accredited by the Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corp. (Pagcor), the government gaming regulator, but was unable to present a license to operate.

25-year-old Malaysian Soh Teck Koung told police he started working in June 2021. Two months later, however, his employer stopped paying his salary, refused to allow him to leave the building and threatened to report him to Filipino. authorities for working without a permit.

On September 26, he managed to call his mother in Malaysia and she reported his ordeal to the Malaysian authorities.

On Thursday, officers from the PNP Women and Child Protection Center rescued 29 others – 23 Burmese and six Chinese nationals – from their dormitory in Concorde Village, Barangay Tambo in Parañaque City. No one has been arrested.

Monthly salary P60K

They were all employees of MOA Cloudzone Corp. based at NexGen Tower in Pasay City, which is one of 127 Pogo service providers accredited by Pagcor.

Cruz said two Burmese nationals – a man and a woman – who were previously employed by MOA Cloudzone told police after being rescued a week earlier that they had a relative still working for the company along with others. foreigners who were “forced and exploited to work as online scammers.

According to the two, they were traveling as tourists in Dubai in January when their countryman, known only as ‘Christine’, messaged them saying she owned two businesses in the Philippines and asked them to work for her as customer service representatives. .

The couple arrived in Manila on March 28 and met Christine at the Barangay Tambo cantonment building where their passports were taken.

Cruz said the two worked for Oriental Group of Company in Palace Plaza, Pasay City and promised a monthly salary of P60,000. “They worked by talking to potential clients encouraging them to play and invest money. money online, which to them is a form of online scam,” he said.

Beaten, Taser

The victims were paid for their work only in May, but not in April. They had to work 14 hours a day without holidays.

When they told Christine they wanted to quit and return to Myanmar, they were told to pay 550,000 pesos each before they could leave. They were eventually transferred to MOA Cloudzone “and worked with the same online scam scheme,” police said.

Cruz said they were locked in a room, beaten and shocked with an electric taser without food or water because they no longer wanted to work and had no ability to pay for their release.

On August 23, they were transferred to a condominium in Pasay City where they were locked up for two days.

Christine promised they would be taken back to Myanmar, but they were instead transferred to Shuang Ma Company, Bacoor, Cavite. They were informed that they had been “sold” for 3.49 million pesos each.

They were locked in separate rooms for three days without food, only water and forced to sign a work contract which also stated that they had obtained a loan of 3.49 million pesos from Christine.

They were forced to work as online scammers again until September 22, when they were rescued, Cruz said.

He said their employer and at least three companies had already been identified by the victims and would be sought by the police.

Pagcor said the foreigners recently arrested for illegal online gambling “are in no way connected to legitimate Pogos” or companies accredited to operate as such.

Alejandro Tengco, president and CEO of Pagcor, said in a statement Friday that any individual, group or entity that conducts online gambling without Pagcor’s approval should not be called Pogo.

“Pogo’s operations are strictly monitored by [Pagcor]and any gaming entity that fails to successfully complete the application process for an offshore gaming license and fails to meet the documentary and financial requirements, among others, cannot qualify as a legal offshore gaming operator, or Pogo,” Tengco said.

He added that Pagcor was coordinating closely with various agencies, such as the Department of Home Affairs and Local Government, the Department of Justice, the PNP and the National Bureau of Investigation “to effectively determine any illegal offshore gambling operations in the country and thwart kidnappings and incidents of human trafficking. —WITH REPORTS BY RONNEL W. DOMINGO, ANGEL YABUT AND ABBY BOISER INQ

RELATED STORY:

Read more

Don’t miss the latest news and information.

To subscribe to MORE APPLICANT to access The Philippine Daily Inquirer and over 70 titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to news, download as early as 4am and share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

]]>
Crypto Bust: China Collars 93 for Laundering $5 Billion in Digital Currencies https://tjdjdj.com/crypto-bust-china-collars-93-for-laundering-5-billion-in-digital-currencies/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 01:12:17 +0000 https://tjdjdj.com/crypto-bust-china-collars-93-for-laundering-5-billion-in-digital-currencies/ China has become a hotbed of illicit crypto trading lately. The country has built a solid reputation among the international community when it comes to scams and illegal activities involving cryptocurrencies. Over the past months and years, a number of notable illicit activities originating in the country or involving Chinese nationals have come to light. […]]]>

China has become a hotbed of illicit crypto trading lately. The country has built a solid reputation among the international community when it comes to scams and illegal activities involving cryptocurrencies.

Over the past months and years, a number of notable illicit activities originating in the country or involving Chinese nationals have come to light.

For example, in July 2021, more than 200 victims from at least 20 countries lost $70 million to fraudsters who posed as attractive Chinese women who convinced them to invest in crypto.

In January of this year, a report was released by Chainalysis disclosing Chinese crypto investors who lost $2.8 billion due to notorious rug draws. There were eight people arrested involved in the fraud.

Last July, unidentified Chinese nationals were arrested after helping with a bogus loan application in India that also involved digital currencies.

But perhaps the cake in this conversation is Chinese police’s recent dismantling of a four-year-old criminal gang activity that was responsible for laundering $5.6 billion.

The “9.15” Large Scale Money Laundering Gang

Led by a certain Hong Mou, the “9.15” gang is believed to be responsible for more than 300 teletraffic incidents involving various collection and payment sites across China.

The group, in operation since 2018, has also facilitated the collection of illicit funds from fraud, gambling and crypto in US dollars to eliminate traces of illegality.

Using cryptocurrency, Mou’s group was able to launder 40 billion yuan which converts to roughly $5.6 billion, according to Chinese authorities.

Following the operation by the Chinese authorities, 93 suspects were arrested and more than 100 computers and mobile phones used by gang members were destroyed.

Funds amounting to 300 million yuan were also frozen in accordance with the case. The successful dismantling of the gang also recovered 7.8 million yuan from the economic losses of various victims.

Cryptocurrency: the dark side

While this could be seen as a victory for the authorities, it undoubtedly puts the asset class in a negative light again.

Over the past few years, countries like the United States and Europe have taken rigid measures to regulate the emergence of crypto as an alternative means of financing for their citizens.

One of their compelling arguments is that cryptocurrencies can be used for illicit activities and that these types of assets are difficult to trace, at least in some respects, which makes them an attractive tool for money laundering. money and other related crimes.

Meanwhile, a criminal case for the arrested suspects and the memorandum of understanding is already being processed by Chinese authorities.

BTCUSD pair reclaims the $19K level, trading at $19,434 on the daily chart | Source: TradingView.com

Featured image from The Verge, Chart: TradingView.com

]]>
Chinese demand for commodities will carry miners, says Jefferies https://tjdjdj.com/chinese-demand-for-commodities-will-carry-miners-says-jefferies/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 18:25:00 +0000 https://tjdjdj.com/chinese-demand-for-commodities-will-carry-miners-says-jefferies/ ArnoMassee/iStock via Getty Images A recovery in Chinese demand for commodities could help mining companies weather a slump in the United States and Europe, Jefferies analysts said. A key question will be how well China’s stimulus measures support the price of industrial metals such as copper. “We are cautiously optimistic about a gradual recovery in […]]]>

ArnoMassee/iStock via Getty Images

A recovery in Chinese demand for commodities could help mining companies weather a slump in the United States and Europe, Jefferies analysts said. A key question will be how well China’s stimulus measures support the price of industrial metals such as copper.

“We are cautiously optimistic about a gradual recovery in Chinese demand, but there is not enough evidence to have strong conviction from this view,” said Christopher LaFemina, analyst at Jefferies, in a report. September 21. “We expect the picture to become clearer over the next few months.”

Key developments to watch include the Chinese Community Party’s National Congress from Oct. 16-22, the twice-a-decade gathering to select party leadership and set strategic goals for at least the next five years.

Investors are also looking for any changes to China’s pandemic restrictions. The country’s border closures and controls this year have been blamed for stunting economic growth.

“We expect commodity prices to bottom in 4Q and remain relatively low in 1H23, with a half-weighted recovery next year,” according to Jefferies. “Mining shares are likely to temporarily decline in the near term, but we would use dollar cost averaging on this weakness.”

Rio Tinto Group (RIO), BHP Group (BHP) and Glencore (OTCPK:GLCNF) are “the best at the moment”, while Freeport-McMoRan (FCX), First Quantum (FM:CA) Alcoa (AA) are ” the best so far.” long-term,” the report said.

]]>
China says US is sending ‘dangerous signals’ to Taiwan | China https://tjdjdj.com/china-says-us-is-sending-dangerous-signals-to-taiwan-china/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 02:28:00 +0000 https://tjdjdj.com/china-says-us-is-sending-dangerous-signals-to-taiwan-china/ China has accused the United States of sending “very wrong and dangerous signals” to Taiwan after the US Secretary of State told his Chinese counterpart on Friday that maintaining peace and stability in Taiwan was a challenge. of vital importance. Taiwan was at the center of the 90-minute “direct and honest” talks between Secretary of […]]]>

China has accused the United States of sending “very wrong and dangerous signals” to Taiwan after the US Secretary of State told his Chinese counterpart on Friday that maintaining peace and stability in Taiwan was a challenge. of vital importance.

Taiwan was at the center of the 90-minute “direct and honest” talks between Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly in New York, said a US official. journalists.

“For our part, the Secretary has made it clear that – in line with our long-standing one-China policy, which again has not changed – the maintenance of peace and stability across the Strait is absolutely , of vital importance,” the senior US administration official said. the official said.

China’s Foreign Ministry, in a statement on the meeting, said the United States was sending “very wrong and dangerous signals” to Taiwan, and that the more rampant Taiwan’s independence activity was, the less there would be. chance of a peaceful settlement.

“The Taiwan issue is an internal Chinese affair, and the United States has no right to interfere in the method that will be used to resolve it,” the ministry quoted Wang as saying.

Tensions over Taiwan skyrocketed after an August visit by US House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi – which was followed by large-scale Chinese military exercises – as well as an engagement by the US President, Joe Biden, to defend himself. -governed island.

Biden’s statement was his most explicit yet on committing US troops to defend the island. It was also the latest instance where he appeared to move beyond a longstanding US policy of “strategic ambiguity,” which does not specify whether the United States would respond militarily to an attack on Taiwan.

The White House insisted its Taiwan policy had not changed, but China said Biden’s remarks sent the wrong signal to those seeking an independent Taiwan.

In a phone call with Biden in July, Chinese leader Xi Jinping warned of Taiwan, saying “those who play with fire will perish.”

The State Department had earlier said Blinken’s meeting with Wang was part of a U.S. effort to “maintain open lines of communication and manage competition responsibly,” and the senior official said Blinken reiterated the openness of the United States to “cooperate with China on issues of global concern”. ”.

Blinken also “highlighted the implications” if China were to provide material support for Russia’s invasion of Ukraine or engage in full sanctions evasion, the official added.

In the past, US officials have said they have seen no evidence of China providing such support.

Blinken “stressed that the United States, China and the international community have an obligation to work to counter the effects of this invasion and also to deter Russia from taking further provocative actions,” the official said.

China regards Taiwan as one of its provinces. Beijing has long vowed to bring Taiwan under its control and has not ruled out using force to do so.
Taiwan’s government strongly opposes China’s sovereignty claims and says only the island’s 23 million people can decide its future.

Taiwan’s foreign ministry, responding to Blinken’s meeting with Wang, said China’s “recent provocative actions” had made the Taiwan Strait a center of discussion, and that China was trying to “confuse the audience international community with arguments and criticisms that contradict reality”.

Blinken’s meeting with Wang was preceded by a meeting between the Quad Group foreign ministers of Australia, India, Japan and the United States, who issued a statement, referring to Indo -Pacific, saying that “we strongly oppose any unilateral action aimed at changing the status quo or increasing tensions in the region”.

Since Pelosi’s visit, “China has taken a number of provocative steps that have purposefully acted to change the status quo,” the US official said.

US Vice President Kamala Harris will discuss Taiwan security in bilateral meetings with leaders of US allies Japan and South Korea during her visit next week, another US official said.

Daniel Russel, the top US diplomat for Asia under President Barack Obama, said the fact that Blinken and Wang met was important after the turmoil caused by Pelosi’s visit, and I hope progress would have been made to arrange a meeting between Xi and Biden on the sidelines of a G20 meeting in November, which would be their first face-to-face meeting as leaders.

“Wang and Blinken’s decision to meet in New York does not guarantee that the November summit will go smoothly or even take place,” said Russel, now a member of the Asia Society. “But if they hadn’t been able to meet, that would have meant the prospects for a summit in November were poor.”

]]>
WPSU Wins National Children’s Multicultural Festival Award https://tjdjdj.com/wpsu-wins-national-childrens-multicultural-festival-award/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 13:51:53 +0000 https://tjdjdj.com/wpsu-wins-national-childrens-multicultural-festival-award/ September 22, 2022September 22, 2022 WPSU received a Public Media Award for Community Engagement from the National Educational Telecommunications Association for its Multicultural Children’s Festival. The award, in the “Children and Family” category, was announced at the 54th Annual Public Media Awards Gala in Charlotte, North Carolina, held on September 18. This was one of […]]]>

WPSU received a Public Media Award for Community Engagement from the National Educational Telecommunications Association for its Multicultural Children’s Festival.

The award, in the “Children and Family” category, was announced at the 54th Annual Public Media Awards Gala in Charlotte, North Carolina, held on September 18. This was one of four community engagement awards given out nationally by the association, which honors the work of its members in community engagement, content, education, marketing/ communications, independent productions and global excellence.

According to the association, the prize rewards “the exemplary community commitment of a station in favor of children and families”.

WPSU created the festival to bring people from diverse countries and ethnicities together to share music, art, food and culture with each other and with families in the community. Inclusion and belonging were the central themes of the free event, held at WPSU studios in April.

More than 800 adults and children attended the five-hour festival, where nearly 85 staff and volunteers from a dozen countries provided cultural experiences and activities. Groups of university students, members of the local community and other organizations presented tables filled with art, history, culture, cuisine and crafts for children and their caregivers to interact with. Music and dance groups performed throughout the day, including African drummers and dancers, a Chinese dragon dance, children playing classical music and Irish dancers.

WPSU plans to make the event an annual celebration.

“The Children’s Multicultural Festival is how WPSU brings people together within our community,” said event coordinator Tamra Fatemi. “Our goal is for every child to be able to see themselves represented in some way and feel a sense of belonging. We hope to increase group participation each year, featuring even more countries, ethnicities, of food, art, dance and cultures.

Learn more about WPSU

]]>
Chinese Association of Monterey Bay to Host 4th Annual Chinese Cultural Festival – Monterey Herald https://tjdjdj.com/chinese-association-of-monterey-bay-to-host-4th-annual-chinese-cultural-festival-monterey-herald/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 21:53:06 +0000 https://tjdjdj.com/chinese-association-of-monterey-bay-to-host-4th-annual-chinese-cultural-festival-monterey-herald/ MONTEREY — The Chinese Association of Monterey Bay says it will champion inclusion, collaboration and awareness next month as the organization commemorates its fourth annual Chinese Cultural Festival. For the first time since 2019, this year’s festival will take place on Sunday, October 16 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Custom House Plaza Monterey. […]]]>

MONTEREY — The Chinese Association of Monterey Bay says it will champion inclusion, collaboration and awareness next month as the organization commemorates its fourth annual Chinese Cultural Festival.

For the first time since 2019, this year’s festival will take place on Sunday, October 16 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Custom House Plaza Monterey. It is a local opportunity to promote greater appreciation of Chinese culture and heritage, the event organizers said, adding that the festival aims to maintain diversity and foster ties between cultural groups in China. the region.

“It’s an important opportunity for reunion within the Chinese community because we have different people of mixed ancestry. But it’s also an opportunity… to welcome different ethnic groups and bond,” said Yong-Ling Beiman, a member of the Chinese Association of Monterey Bay. “It’s a gathering of old and new friends, and an experience in which people can explore connections and continuities through culture, artistic creation and entertainment.”

Free to the public, the October festival will highlight authentic Chinese art, food, games, cultural displays and folk dances. The Chinese Association of Monterey Bay has also invited local Japanese and Korean organizations — as well as the Pacific Grove Adult Education Center — to perform in what it hopes will be a living example of cross-cultural friendship.

“Our goal is to promote harmonious diversity,” Beiman said.

The Chinese Cultural Festival was established in 2017 to ensure that the presence of the local Chinese community is not only widely known but understood, said Richard Zhang, president of the Chinese Association of Monterey Bay. Zhang, who has been with the association since its inception more than eight years ago, said raising awareness has always been central to the festival’s purpose.

The Chinese community has deep roots in Monterey Bay. In 1851, a group of Chinese families immigrated to the California coast and established a fishing village at Point Alones, where the Hopkins Marine Station is located today. It was the first and largest family-run Chinese community in the United States at the time, and is credited with pioneering the Monterey Bay commercial fishing industry. Eventually, families dispersed throughout the area when the village of Point Alones mysteriously caught fire in 1906.

Reconciling historic ties with current members of the community, the Chinese Association of Monterey Bay recognizes next month’s festival as a chance to come together and honor culture collectively.

Embracing the local Chinese community is particularly salient on the Monterey Peninsula as the dust continues to settle since the Pacific Grove Lantern Festival ended earlier this year. Disbanded after numerous complaints about how it appropriated Chinese culture, the Lantern Festival prompted city officials to issue an apology for a history of structural racism and discrimination against Chinese immigrants in Pacific Grove.

Asked about holding this year’s Chinese Cultural Festival following the dissolution of the Lantern Festival, Zhang assured that the two events “are completely separate” and noted that the Chinese Association of Monterey Bay is “just trying to to bring people together to show Chinese culture and build good relations with the community.

Echoing Zhang’s desire to stay positive, Beiman said “for this event, the performances will be authentic.”

“The Chinese performances will be presented by local Chinese. Japanese performances will be staged by local Japanese people. There will be no appropriation of culture,” she continued. “We would like to look at this issue in a positive direction. We want to demonstrate that we live in a marvelous region… where different ethnic groups live in harmony. This demonstrates DEI (diversity, equity and inclusion). »

]]>
Would US forces defend Taiwan? Biden says ‘yes’ again https://tjdjdj.com/would-us-forces-defend-taiwan-biden-says-yes-again/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 04:36:00 +0000 https://tjdjdj.com/would-us-forces-defend-taiwan-biden-says-yes-again/ Washington CNN — President Joe Biden reiterated that US military personnel would defend Taiwan should the Chinese military launch an invasion of the democratically ruled island. Appearing on the CBS program “60 Minutes” On Sunday, Biden was asked if “American forces, American men and women would defend Taiwan in the event of a Chinese invasion,” […]]]>


Washington
CNN

President Joe Biden reiterated that US military personnel would defend Taiwan should the Chinese military launch an invasion of the democratically ruled island.

Appearing on the CBS program “60 Minutes” On Sunday, Biden was asked if “American forces, American men and women would defend Taiwan in the event of a Chinese invasion,” a prospect that US officials privately fear is becoming increasingly likely.

“Yes,” Biden said.

This isn’t the first time Biden has appeared to venture beyond the longstanding US approach to “strategic ambiguity” when it comes to Taiwan’s defense. More recently, during a visit to Tokyo in May, Biden said the United States would intervene militarily if China tried to take Taiwan by force.

The White House was quick to downplay Biden’s previous comments on Taiwan, reiterating that US policy hasn’t changed, and on Sunday ’60 Minutes’ reported receiving a response similar to Biden’s responses in their interview. .

Taiwan is less than 110 miles (177 kilometers) off the coast of China. For more than 70 years, the two sides have been governed separately, but that hasn’t stopped the ruling Chinese Communist Party from claiming the island as its own – even though it has never controlled it.

Chinese leader Xi Jinping said “reunification” between China and Taiwan was inevitable and refused to rule out the use of force. Tensions between Beijing and Taipei are at their highest in decades, with the Chinese military holding major military exercises near the island.

Under the “One China” policy, the United States recognizes China’s position that Taiwan is part of China, but has never officially recognized the Communist Party’s claim to the 23 million self-governing island. of inhabitants. The United States provides defensive weapons to Taiwan, but has remained intentionally ambiguous about whether it would intervene militarily in the event of a Chinese attack.

Biden reiterated his commitment to these policies in the “60 Minutes” interview.

“We agree with what we signed a long time ago. And that there is a ‘one China’ policy, and that Taiwan makes its own judgment on its independence. We are not moving – we let’s not encourage their independence… It’s their decision,” he said.

But when asked if US forces would defend the island, he said they would: “Yes, if in fact there was an unprecedented attack.”

China did not respond to Biden’s comments Monday morning. Previously, Beijing had expressed its “firm opposition” to similar remarks by the American president and accused Washington of violating the “One China” principle.

Biden’s comments on Sunday are likely to spark further speculation about potential shifts in U.S. policy on Taiwan, but analysts noted that his choice of words left room for interpretation and was by no means unequivocal.

Drew Thompson, a visiting senior fellow at the National University of Singapore’s Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, said “we’re always tempted to read a lot into the president’s statements,” but Biden’s view doesn’t matter. not really changed.

Thompson, a former US Department of Defense official, said the specific nature of any US defense does not necessarily mean US boots on the ground in Taiwan.

In the event of a Chinese attack on the island, the Pentagon would present Biden with “a range of options” for the deployment of US forces, he said.

Using US naval or air assets in an offshore role, even US cyber assets to hinder a potential Chinese invasion, or simply a US show of force in the region, could all be among those options.

Biden’s latest statement could put a strain on US-China relations, following US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s visit to Taipei in August. Beijing responded to his trip with unprecedented military exercises around the island.

The Taiwan issue was also among the main talking points during last week’s meeting between Xi and Russian President Vladimir Putin at a regional summit in Uzbekistan, with both men agreeing that Chinese sovereignty over the island is a non-negotiable “red line”.

Xi also said he appreciated “Russia’s adherence to the ‘one China’ principle and stressed that Taiwan is part of China.”

Debates around the likelihood of a possible Chinese invasion have intensified in the wake of Russia’s unprovoked attack on Ukraine, with many analysts indicating that Beijing will likely be watching the situation in Europe carefully.

The US intelligence community has made clear its belief that China is actively trying to build a military capable of taking control of Taiwan – even in the face of US support for the island.

Last week, CIA Deputy Director David Cohen said that while Xi hadn’t made the decision to invade Taiwan, he wanted China’s People’s Liberation Army to have the capability to take the lead. control of the island by force by 2027.

The US intelligence community does not believe Beijing has made a decision on whether to prosecute or not, Cohen said, adding that it is believed Xi would prefer to gain control of Taiwan through “non-military means”.

The CIA official also said the agency is paying close attention to the lessons China is learning from the war in Ukraine.

“We are watching very carefully how the Chinese understand the situation in Ukraine – how the Russians behaved, how the Ukrainians behaved and the implications of that for their own plans, as they might be in Taiwan,” he said. said Cohen.

]]>
The Inflation Reduction Act is the start of the recovery of critical mineral chains https://tjdjdj.com/the-inflation-reduction-act-is-the-start-of-the-recovery-of-critical-mineral-chains/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 13:41:14 +0000 https://tjdjdj.com/the-inflation-reduction-act-is-the-start-of-the-recovery-of-critical-mineral-chains/ The Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) passed by Congress and signed into law by US President Joe Biden on August 16 promises to dramatically change US energy and foreign policy. The law provides for billions of dollars in tax incentives for renewable energies, provisions supporting offshore oil and gas leasing and other innovations designed to enhance […]]]>

The Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) passed by Congress and signed into law by US President Joe Biden on August 16 promises to dramatically change US energy and foreign policy. The law provides for billions of dollars in tax incentives for renewable energies, provisions supporting offshore oil and gas leasing and other innovations designed to enhance U.S. energy security while fighting climate change.

But an important piece of the law has been largely overlooked. Under the IRA, there is a commitment to increase the US domestic supply of critical minerals – lithium, nickel, manganese and graphite, among others – to provide the materials needed for a vast expansion in electric vehicles (electric vehicles), batteries and renewable energy production infrastructure.

For the first time, US policy directly links the supply of these misunderstood minerals to a massive paradigm shift in the automotive market. As the markets for these materials are diverse, global and largely dominated by China, this offers a rare example of bipartisan concern.

The Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) passed by Congress and signed into law by US President Joe Biden on August 16 promises to dramatically change US energy and foreign policy. The law provides for billions of dollars in tax incentives for renewable energies, provisions supporting offshore oil and gas leasing and other innovations designed to enhance U.S. energy security while fighting climate change.

But an important piece of the law has been largely overlooked. Under the IRA, there is a commitment to increase the US domestic supply of critical minerals – lithium, nickel, manganese and graphite, among others – to provide the materials needed for a vast expansion in electric vehicles (electric vehicles), batteries and renewable energy production infrastructure.

For the first time, US policy directly links the supply of these misunderstood minerals to a massive paradigm shift in the automotive market. As the markets for these materials are diverse, global and largely dominated by China, this offers a rare example of bipartisan concern.

The objective of the policy is threefold. The Biden administration wants to accelerate the energy transition to low-carbon technologies; encourage domestic manufacturing; and improve US energy security, ostensibly by reducing its dependence on foreign supplies of the minerals needed to support the energy transition. For this reason, IRA EV tax credits come with significant warnings— that is, they only apply if the materials used to construct the vehicle come either from the United States or from countries with which the United States has free trade agreements.

This provision exposes the United States to a significant foreign policy challenge. The huge amount of critical minerals needed to fuel the energy transition is staggering, and currently global mineral markets and their associated supply chains are cornered by a small number of countries, with China leading the way. While the 20th century saw battles over access to oil, the 21st century will likely be defined by a fight over critical minerals, especially as the United States views China as a global competitor and strives to limit their dependence on Chinese supplies for the manufacture of electric vehicles and a wide variety of energy and defense technologies.

Critical minerals like oil and gas can be divided into upstream, midstream and downstream sectors. Upstream, or production, is dominated by producers of raw materials. Australia and Chile together produce about 70 percent of global production lithium, a mineral needed to make EV batteries. The Democratic Republic of the Congo contributes around 70% of world production cobaltIndonesia provides about 30 percent of nickeland Chile and Peru dominate copperwith 40% of the world share.

Although China is a considerable producer strategic minerals – sixth for nickel and third for copper – it dominates the midstream refining and advanced downstream manufacturing markets. It didn’t happen overnight. China has made a concerted set of policy and investment decisions at home and abroad over the past decades, mainly to provide cheap finished goods to supply its own booming domestic market. According to a study by the Brookings Institution, China refines 68% of the world’s nickel, 40% of its copper, 59% of its lithium and 73% of its cobalt. More importantly, China has 78% of the world’s electric vehicle battery manufacturing capacity, the bulk of the world’s solar panel production and three-quarters of the world’s lithium-ion battery factories.

The United States, on the other hand, has seen its status as a mineral producer decline. From 27% in 1996, the share of the United States in upstream lithium market fell to just 1% in 2020, with only one operating mine in the Clayton Valley, Nevada. Knowledge and intermediate refining plants are almost non-existent. Downstream capabilities are also lagging: despite massive investment in manufacturing new lithium batteries, the U.S. ability was only 44 gigawatt hours compared to China’s 558 gigawatt hours in 2020.

The United States therefore faces an uphill battle. To meet the requirements set by the IRA, domestic production of critical minerals and electric vehicle components will need to expand significantly. Demand for electric vehicles has increased dramatically, in part due to high oil prices. Electric vehicle registrations have increased 60 percent year-over-year in the first quarter of 2022, and the electric vehicle market is expected to grow from $24 billion in 2020 to $137.43 billion by 2028. Private industry has already answered the call, with 13 new “gigausinesfor the production of lithium-ion batteries which are expected to be completed by 2025.

To achieve energy security, energy transition, and the IRA’s national economic goals, the Biden administration must devote more time and energy to addressing issues around critical minerals. These efforts require dedicated diplomatic efforts, such as those designed under the direction of the U.S. Department of State Energy Resource Governance Initiative began under the Trump administration and the nascent Mineral Security Partnership.

Focusing on five critical areas can help lay the foundations for a dynamic, more resilient and robust set of supply chains, and thus effectively support energy transitions.

First, focus on sustainable mining. Mining practices have improved dramatically over the past few decades. Modern approaches to sustainability have become common practice in mining operations, from water and air pollution techniques to better community engagement. Nevertheless, the industry is still seen as dirty, old fashioned and unsophisticated. The role of mining in supporting clean energy transitions is allowing a new narrative to emerge for the sector. Large companies will contribute by applying advanced technologies while improving emissions monitoring and safety.

Second, make markets transparent and functional. The scale of trade in various critical minerals is very small and opaque compared to larger markets like oil or coal. Markets for critical minerals often exhibit a dominant player or a small number of players, poor price signals and weak governance. This leads to inefficient market signals for investment, impediments that can create huge barriers to production and trade.

Third, think in terms of supply chains, not just rocks. Each of the critical minerals has its own unique supply chain. In the United States, for example, there are now 50 minerals on the list published by the US Geological Survey. Each has a different set of characteristics, geographies, and uses. Additionally, some of those on the list are known as secondary or tertiary minerals – most cobalt is a byproduct of nickel, for example. Issues from mining to chemical processing to advanced manufacturing make it essential to design policies that recognize all stages.

Fourth, use circular economy concepts. Once products reach the end of their life, the materials they contain can often be recycled. Significant economic and technological efforts must be made to raise these rates, which are terribly low in the United States. For example, the recycling amount of lithium-ion batteries is only about 1 to 5 percent.

Fifth, facilitate faster authorization and regulation. As in other areas of industrial policy set out in the IRA, a key to success in the critical mineral space will be to focus on allowing as well as social acceptance. To build an industrial infrastructure in the United States, there is a complicated patchwork of rules and regulations in addition to the need for deep community engagement. In contrast, China has a different set of bureaucratic obstacles but can prioritize infrastructure based on directives from above.

Innovation and diplomacy are important ways to facilitate, if not radically alter, the demand for key materials and the nature of their trade and markets. These innovations also explicitly highlight key features of governance, environment and societal engagement in supply chains. Without this more holistic view of the sector and a recognition of the role that China will continue to play, it is likely to become a significant obstacle to energy transitions. Potential scarcity must be taken into account in the design of new products. The trade-offs, for example, between the use of critical materials and energy efficiency need to be better understood.

The IRA promises a drastic reduction in US carbon emissions and an acceleration of the energy transition away from fossil fuels. The United States needs more wind turbines, solar panels and electric cars. But to make this possible, more mines will be needed.

]]>
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell says he was surrounded by FBI in Mankato Hardee’s drive-thru https://tjdjdj.com/mypillow-ceo-mike-lindell-says-he-was-surrounded-by-fbi-in-mankato-hardees-drive-thru/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 22:25:17 +0000 https://tjdjdj.com/mypillow-ceo-mike-lindell-says-he-was-surrounded-by-fbi-in-mankato-hardees-drive-thru/ MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell said he was driving through the drive-thru of a Hardee fast-food restaurant in Mankato on Tuesday when FBI agents surrounded him and seized his cellphone via a search warrant. “A car pulled up perpendicular in front of me. Another one to my right. Another one came up behind me, all kinds […]]]>

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell said he was driving through the drive-thru of a Hardee fast-food restaurant in Mankato on Tuesday when FBI agents surrounded him and seized his cellphone via a search warrant.

“A car pulled up perpendicular in front of me. Another one to my right. Another one came up behind me, all kinds of cars,” Lindell said, speaking to the Star Tribune from another phone on Wednesday. “I opened the door, I said ‘Who are you?’ And they said, ‘we’re the FBI.'”

Lindell said he was driving home from a duck hunting trip in Iowa when he stopped to eat. In an interview lasting almost 40 minutes, he lambasted both political parties, the government and the media, including the “rotten Star Tribune”, for not accepting his baseless claims of voter fraud.

He said authorities questioned him about Dominion Voting Systems and a Colorado employee who was charged in what prosecutors call a “deceptive scheme” to breach voting system technology used across the country.

Lindell has repeatedly claimed, without evidence, that Dominion rigged its voting machines to illegally give President Joe Biden more votes than former President Donald Trump in the 2020 election. State after state, critics have confirmed results showing Biden won.

Federal prosecutors have charged Mesa County, Colorado, Clerk Tina Peters with multiple offenses including criminal impersonation and attempting to influence a public official. An assistant clerk was also charged, pleaded guilty and sentenced to two years probation.

Lindell hosted a “cybersymposium” in August 2021 where Peters appeared on stage. The MyPillow mogul promised to reveal evidence of tampering with voting machines at the event, but did not follow through. Instead, a hard-drive copy of Mesa County’s voting system was distributed and posted online, attendees and state officials said. The copy included proprietary software used by election offices nationwide that experts say could allow anyone to probe the system for vulnerabilities that could be exploited.

Lindell has been one of the loudest and most prominent voices pushing voter fraud conspiracy theories since the 2020 election. He relied on previously debunked claims from other sources to support his argument that the election was stolen from Trump.

He reiterated some of those claims on Wednesday, accusing the Chinese Communist Party and “one-party, deep state, globalists” of “stealing” the election. And he accused Republicans who did not support baseless voter fraud theories of a cover-up, calling them “criminals.”

Lindell’s false claims did not come without consequences. He and his company MyPillow are facing a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit from Dominion Voter Systems and Smartmatic. Lindell and MyPillow have also filed lawsuits against the voting machine companies.

During the meeting with the FBI, Lindell said he asked the agents if their warrant was related to the Jan. 6, 2021 riot at the U.S. Capitol. “They said ‘absolutely not’,” according to Lindell, who said he then told officers he would be happy to testify before the ‘dumb’ US House committee investigating the riot and what happened. caused it.

Comparing the FBI’s seizure of his cellphone to the “Gestapo in Nazi Germany,” Lindell said he didn’t want to hand over the phone at first, but did after calling his lawyer, who told him he had to. He said he ran the day-to-day business of five companies from that phone.

Officers also asked him why he was flying between different states, Lindell said. He told them, “I go to attorneys general and politicians and try to get them to get rid of these voting machines in our country.

Lindell said he would have returned the phone ahead of time if the FBI had “come and asked me.”

“I’ll give them whatever they want,” Lindell said. “They didn’t have to take my phone and make a big scene at Hardee’s in Mankato, Minn.”

In a Instagram post On Wednesday, Lindell told his followers to “fight back” against the FBI’s seizure of his phone “by shopping at MyPillow,” and shared a promo code.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

]]>
Australia: Acting against China’s abuses in Xinjiang https://tjdjdj.com/australia-acting-against-chinas-abuses-in-xinjiang/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 06:32:43 +0000 https://tjdjdj.com/australia-acting-against-chinas-abuses-in-xinjiang/ (Sydney) – The Australian government should take strong action in response to new evidence that the Chinese government is engaging crimes against humanity targeting Uyghurs and other Turkic communities in the Xinjiang region, Human Rights Watch said today. These actions should include imposing targeted sanctions, introducing legislation to prevent the importation of goods made with […]]]>

(Sydney) – The Australian government should take strong action in response to new evidence that the Chinese government is engaging crimes against humanity targeting Uyghurs and other Turkic communities in the Xinjiang region, Human Rights Watch said today. These actions should include imposing targeted sanctions, introducing legislation to prevent the importation of goods made with forced labor and leading efforts for accountability measures at the Human Rights Council session. United Nations man from September 12, 2022.

The revolutionary UN report published on August 31 by the outgoing United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Michelle Bachelet, contained victim testimonies that substantiate mass arbitrary detention, torture, cultural persecution, forced labor and other violations grave human rights. It recommends that states, businesses and the international community take action to end abuses and advance justice and accountability.

“Australia should impose targeted sanctions against Chinese government officials who are implicated in crimes against humanity and other serious abuses against Uyghurs and other Turkish Muslims in Xinjiang,” said Sophie Richardson, director of the China Division at Human Rights Watch. “The European Union, United States, United Kingdom and Canada have already taken these steps, and Australia should join these efforts to hold those responsible for these abuses accountable and stand with the victims. “

In a coordinated effort in March 2021, the European Union, the United Kingdom, the United States and Canada imposed targeted sanctionsincluding travel bans and asset freezes, against senior officials in Xinjiang who have been accused of serious human rights violations against Uyghur Muslims.

In 2021, Australia past ‘Magnitsky-style’ legislation that reformed Australia’s sanctions framework, making it easier for the government to apply sanctions to those responsible for serious human rights violations and abuses, wherever they occur in the world.

Following the release of the United Nations High Commissioner’s report, the Australian opposition party, the Coalition, reported that he would lend bipartisan support to any “appropriately targeted sanctions” that Prime Minister Anthony Albanese’s government implements in response to human rights abuses in Xinjiang.

The government should also introduce legislation blocking the import of goods made by forced labor, both from Xinjiang and other places inside and outside China.

In the United States, the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Law, which came into force in June, gives customs authorities increased powers to enforce an existing ban on forced labor imports. The new law creates a presumption that any goods made in whole or in part in Xinjiang or produced by entities in China linked to forced labor cannot be imported into the United States. Companies can only rebut this presumption if they provide “clear and convincing evidence” that the goods are free of forced labor, an almost impossible hurdle to clear given the difficulty of performing human rights due diligence. man in Xinjiang and China more broadly.

Canada also prohibits imports of goods produced in whole or in part by forced labor and, in January 2021, announced an intensification of efforts to prevent companies from being complicit or profiting from them in the Xinjiang region.

The UK has also introduced measures which include tips to UK businesses on the risks faced by Xinjiang-linked businesses, advice to public bodies on excluding suppliers if there is evidence of human rights abuses in their supply chains, a review of controls export to Xinjiang and fines for companies that do not publish statements describing their efforts to eliminate forced labor in their supply chains.

Asked about UN report on Xinjiang, Australian Foreign Minister Penny Wong said on September 6 that it focuses on improving Australia’s modern slavery law to “ensure that we do not promote, condone or financially support forced labour”. Whereas government review of the Modern Slavery Act could lead to positive developments, it will not be completed until March 2023. The Modern Slavery Act should be strengthened to require companies to identify and address forced labor and other human rights risks in their own operations and global value chains, Human Rights Watch said.

Human Rights Watch urged the Australian government to pass new forced labor legislation that designates Xinjiang as a region with a high risk of forced labor, and to introduce a presumption of forced labor for imports made in whole or in part in Xinjiang.

Last year, the Australian Labor Party then in opposition voted in the senate to support a bill introduced by Independent Senator Rex Patrick that would have banned the importation of products made by forced labor.

Human Rights Watch also urged the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade to provide clear advice to Australian businesses on the risks of buying products or investing in Xinjiang, especially in high-risk sectors such as clothing manufacturing and the solar panel industry. Australian businesses should also be encouraged to join the “Call to action to end Uyghur forced labor.”

Australia should also lead efforts at the upcoming session of the UN Human Rights Council to establish an independent inquiry into China’s abuses in Xinjiang, taking all necessary steps to advance accountability and deliver to Uyghurs and others the justice to which they are entitled.

“The Australian government should walk the talk to help Uyghurs and other oppressed communities in Xinjiang,” Richardson said. “Australia should stand with a growing global coalition of nations that will not allow the Chinese government’s crimes against humanity to go unpunished.”

]]>